“Projects are expected to be game changing”

We interviewed Dr. Nathalie ter Wengel MD, European Head Global External R&D and Innovation at Pfizer, and member of our selection committee, on her view of the European startup landscape and what she expects from BaseLaunch candidates.

Dr. Nathalie ter Wengel MD

Dr. Nathalie ter Wengel MD

 

What is your opinion about the Swiss and European startup healthcare ecosystem?

It is a rich ecosystem, where government support has had a strong influence on the formation of new companies. However, the valuation of European companies is lagging behind compared to US companies, and it is more difficult for European companies to attract investment.

Why do you engage with BaseLaunch?

Through BaseLaunch, we hope to stay well informed about the innovation coming out of Europe. The program is an additional source to identify early-stage opportunities with promising science.

What do you look for in potential projects?

Projects are expected to be game changing, and are expected to address a high, unmet medical need. It is important for projects to have a clear outline on the expected outcomes within a 12-month timeframe.

About Dr. Nathalie ter Wengel

Dr. Nathalie ter Wengel, a medical doctor, is the European Head Global External R&D and Innovation at Pfizer, where she is responsible for establishing new collaborations and exploring licensing and other corporate development opportunities across all therapeutic areas. After having worked in the hospital, with extensive experience in internal medicine, Nathalie started her commercial career as European Medical Manager at Pfizer. It was this experience, coupled with her father’s illness, that convinced her of the urgent need for change in the pharmaceutical industry. Consequently, she started up a company called myTomorrows focused on compassionate use, and served as Chief Medical Officer before joining Galapagos as Business Development Director, where she played a key role in the very successful NASDAQ IPO and in partnering filgotinib.